On the 7th day...

I rested. Here are better words than mine.

Excerpt from Rising Strong by Brene Brown:

It's the same with life: We can't chart a new course until we find out where we are, how we came to that point and where we want to go. Reckon comes from the Old English recenian, meaning "to narrate." When you reckon with emotion, you can change your narrative. You have to acknowledge your feelings and get curious about the story behind them. Then you can challenge those confabulations and get to the truth. 

I'll walk you through it. The next time you're in a situation that pushes your buttons—from a breakup to a setback at work—and you're overwhelmed by anger, disappointment or embarrassment, try this practice. 

Engage with your feelings. 

Your body may offer the first clue that you're having an emotional reaction: for instance, your boss assigns the project you wanted to a colleague, and your face begins to feel hot. Or your response may involve racing thoughts or replaying the event in slow motion. You don't need to know exactly where the feelings are coming from: you just have to acknowledge them. 

My stomach is in knots. 
I want to punch a wall. 
I need Oreos. Lots of them.
 

Get curious about the story behind the feelings. 

Now you're going to ask yourself a few questions. Again, it's not necessary to answer them right off the bat. 

Why am I being so hard on everyone? 
What happened right before this Oreo craving set in? 
I'm obsessing over what my sister said. Why?
 

This step can be surprisingly difficult. You're furious because Todd got the project, but it may feel easier to steamroll over your anger with contempt: Todd's a brownnoser. This company's a joke. Getting curious about your feelings may lead to some discoveries: What if you're more hurt than you realized? Or what if your attitude could have played a part? But pushing through discomfort is how we get to the truth. 

Write it down. 

The most effective way to become truly aware of our stories is to write them down, so get your thoughts on paper. Nothing fancy—you can just finish these sentences: 

The story I'm making up... 
My emotions... 
My thinking... 
My body... 
My beliefs... 
My actions...
 

For instance, you might write, I'm so peeved. I feel like I'm having a heatstroke. She thinks I'm incapable. I want to hurl a stapler. 

You can be mad, self-righteous, confused. A story driven by emotion and self-protection probably doesn't involve accuracy, logic or civility. If your story contains those things, it's likely that you're not being fully honest. 

Get ready to rumble. 

It's time to poke and prod at your findings, exploring the ins and outs. The first questions may be the simplest: 

1. What are the facts, and what are my assumptions? 

I really don't know why my boss picked Todd. And I didn't tell her I was interested in the project—I figured she knew.
 

2. What do I need to know about the others involved? 

Maybe Todd has some special skill or she has me in mind for something else.
 

Now we get to the more difficult questions: 

3. What am I really feeling? What part did I play? 

I feel so worthless. I'm failing in my career. And I don't want to ask for anything because someone might say no.
 

You may learn that you've been masking shame with cynicism, or that being vulnerable and asking for what you want is preferable to stewing in resentment. These truths may be uncomfortable, but they can be the basis of meaningful change. 

Figuring out your own story could take 20 minutes or 20 years. And you may not make one big transformation; maybe it's a series of incremental changes. You just have to feel your way through. 

If you're thinking this sounds too hard, I get it. The reckoning can feel dangerous because you're confronting yourself—the fear, aggression, shame and blame. Facing our stories takes courage. But owning our stories is the only way we get to write a brave new ending. 


Read more here.